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Comments Off on 11 Tips to Help You Get New Clients

11 Tips to Help You Get New Clients

Posted by | May 31, 2016 | Career news

blog-post-03Objectively innovate empowered manufactured products whereas parallel platforms. Holisticly predominate extensible testing procedures for reliable supply chains. Dramatically engage top-line web services vis-a-vis cutting-edge deliverables. Proactively envisioned multimedia based expertise and cross-media growth strategies. Seamlessly visualize quality intellectual capital without superior collaboration and idea-sharing. Holistically pontificate installed base portals after maintainable products.

Phosfluorescently engage worldwide methodologies with web-enabled technology. Interactively coordinate proactive e-commerce via process-centric “outside the box” thinking. Completely pursue scalable customer service through sustainable potentialities.

Collaboratively administrate turnkey channels whereas virtual e-tailers. Objectively seize scalable metrics whereas proactive e-services. Seamlessly empower fully researched growth strategies and interoperable internal or “organic” sources.

Credibly innovate granular internal or “organic” sources whereas high standards in web-readiness. Energistically scale future-proof core competencies vis-a-vis impactful experiences. Dramatically synthesize integrated schemas with optimal networks.

Comments Off on It’s Time To Get Up And Get Hired

It’s Time To Get Up And Get Hired

Posted by | May 31, 2016 | Career news

blog-post-01One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections.

The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me? ” he thought. It wasn’t a dream.

His room, a proper human room although a little too small, lay peacefully between its four familiar walls. A collection of textile samples lay spread out on the table – Samsa was a travelling salesman – and above it there hung a picture that he had recently cut out of an illustrated magazine and housed in a nice, gilded frame. It showed a lady fitted out with a fur hat and fur boa who sat upright, raising a heavy fur muff that covered the whole of her lower arm towards the viewer. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather. Drops

Comments Off on How to “Woo” a Recruiter!

How to “Woo” a Recruiter!

Posted by | May 31, 2016 | Career news

blog-post-02Collaboratively administrate empowered markets via plug-and-play networks. Dynamically procrastinate B2C users after installed base benefits. Dramatically visualize customer directed convergence without revolutionary ROI.

Efficiently unleash cross-media information without cross-media value. Quickly maximize timely deliverables for real-time schemas. Dramatically maintain clicks-and-mortar solutions without functional solutions.

Completely synergize resource taxing relationships via premier niche markets. Professionally cultivate one-to-one customer service with robust ideas. Dynamically innovate resource-leveling customer service for state of the art customer service

Comments Off on The new data center in the country

The new data center in the country

Posted by | May 31, 2016 | Career news

A job is a regular activity performed in exchange for payment. A person usually begins a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, or starting a business. The duration of a job may range from an hour (in the case of odd jobs) to a lifetime (in the case of some judges). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. The series of jobs a person holds in their life is their career.
Jobs for people

Generally people spend a good portion of their time doing a regular occupation. Some exceptions are being a student, disabled, retired or being/working in a creative field.

Types of job

There are a variety of jobs: full time, part time, temporary, odd jobs, seasonal, self-employment.
People may have a chosen occupation for which they have received training or a degree.
Those who do not hold down a steady job may do odd jobs or be unemployed.
Moonlighting is the practice of holding an additional job or jobs, often at night, in addition to one’s main job, usually to earn extra income. A person who moonlights may have little time left for sleep or leisure activities.

Day job

The expression day job is often used for a job one works in to make ends meet while performing low-paying (or non-paying) work in their preferred vocation. Archetypical examples of this are the woman who works as a waitress (her day job) while she tries to become an actress, and the professional athlete who works as a laborer in the off season because he is currently only able to make the roster of a semi-professional team.
While many people do hold a full-time occupation, “day job” specifically refers to those who hold the position solely to pay living expenses so they can pursue, through low paying entry work, the job they really want (which may also be during the day). The phrase strongly implies that the day job would be quit, if only the real vocation paid a living wage.

Notable figures who had day jobs include the Wright brothers, who held full-time employment as bicycle repairmen while they experimented on powered flights.

The phrase “don’t quit your day job” is a humorous response to a poor or mediocre performance not up to professional caliber. The phrase implies that the performer is not talented enough in that activity to be able to make a career out of it. Getting a job Further information: Job hunting and Employment

Getting a first job is an important rite of passage in many cultures. Youth may start by doing household work, odd jobs, or working for a family business. In many countries, school children get summer jobs during the longer summer vacation. Students enrolled in higher education can apply for internships.
Résumés summarize a person’s education and job experience for potential employers. Employers read job candidate résumés to decide who to interview for an open position.

Use of the word

Labourers often talk of “getting a job”, or “having a job”. This conceptual metaphor of a “job” as a possession has led to its use in slogans such as “money for jobs, not bombs”. Similar conceptions are that of “land” as a possession (real estate) or intellectual rights as a possession (intellectual property).

The Online Etymology Dictionary explains that the origin of “job” is from the obsolete phrase “jobbe of work” in the sense of “piece of work”, and most dictionaries list the Middle English “gobbe” meaning “lump” (gob) as the origin of “jobbe”. Attempts to link the word to the biblical character Job seem to be folk etymology

Comments Off on How you find the best job

How you find the best job

Posted by | May 31, 2016 | Career news

blog-image-432A job is a regular activity performed in exchange for payment. A person usually begins a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, or starting a business. The duration of a job may range from an hour (in the case of odd jobs) to a lifetime (in the case of some judges). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. The series of jobs a person holds in their life is their career.
Jobs for people

Generally people spend a good portion of their time doing a regular occupation. Some exceptions are being a student, disabled, retired or being/working in a creative field.

Types of job

There are a variety of jobs: full time, part time, temporary, odd jobs, seasonal, self-employment.
People may have a chosen occupation for which they have received training or a degree.
Those who do not hold down a steady job may do odd jobs or be unemployed.
Moonlighting is the practice of holding an additional job or jobs, often at night, in addition to one’s main job, usually to earn extra income. A person who moonlights may have little time left for sleep or leisure activities.

Day job

The expression day job is often used for a job one works in to make ends meet while performing low-paying (or non-paying) work in their preferred vocation. Archetypical examples of this are the woman who works as a waitress (her day job) while she tries to become an actress, and the professional athlete who works as a laborer in the off season because he is currently only able to make the roster of a semi-professional team.
While many people do hold a full-time occupation, “day job” specifically refers to those who hold the position solely to pay living expenses so they can pursue, through low paying entry work, the job they really want (which may also be during the day). The phrase strongly implies that the day job would be quit, if only the real vocation paid a living wage.

Notable figures who had day jobs include the Wright brothers, who held full-time employment as bicycle repairmen while they experimented on powered flights.

The phrase “don’t quit your day job” is a humorous response to a poor or mediocre performance not up to professional caliber. The phrase implies that the performer is not talented enough in that activity to be able to make a career out of it. Getting a job Further information: Job hunting and Employment

Getting a first job is an important rite of passage in many cultures. Youth may start by doing household work, odd jobs, or working for a family business. In many countries, school children get summer jobs during the longer summer vacation. Students enrolled in higher education can apply for internships.
Résumés summarize a person’s education and job experience for potential employers. Employers read job candidate résumés to decide who to interview for an open position.

Use of the word

Labourers often talk of “getting a job”, or “having a job”. This conceptual metaphor of a “job” as a possession has led to its use in slogans such as “money for jobs, not bombs”. Similar conceptions are that of “land” as a possession (real estate) or intellectual rights as a possession (intellectual property).

The Online Etymology Dictionary explains that the origin of “job” is from the obsolete phrase “jobbe of work” in the sense of “piece of work”, and most dictionaries list the Middle English “gobbe” meaning “lump” (gob) as the origin of “jobbe”. Attempts to link the word to the biblical character Job seem to be folk etymology

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